I spoke the other day to a group of students at the Greater Los Angeles Press Photographer’s Association about their career expectations. Had a great time, saw a number of my former colleagues, all of whom I respect and admire greatly.

Sports Illustrated assignment

It was a short presentation. I tend to shy away from the quintessential “let me show you my work” approach usually found at these seminars. I remember vividly being in their shoes years ago and having so many questions yet not really knowing what to ask. Speakers at various workshops like the San Jose Mercury News Graphics Conference or the NPPA’s Flying Short courses, to say nothing of the Eddie Adams Workshop that I attended in 1989, would show their award winning work and I would sit and wo

nder how the hell do I put together a portfolio? In an effort to make things practical, whatever image I projected I talked about the expectations from the assigning publication, the result of the shoot and a few interesting stories associated with the image.

Forty five minutes is a quick presentation and I really wanted to go more deeply into the business aspects of freelancing. I told them that the likelihood of them freelancing straight out of college these days compared to a decade or two ago is quite high. With fewer publications and fewer staff positions, it’s important that the emerging photojournalists not only have multimedia story telling skills, which most universities now offer instruction in, but that they understand how to present a portfolio, how to make appointments and what to expect from the publication.

No one knew what a Work for Hire agreement was, though the vast majority of them will be presented one when they seek freelance work from major publications. That’s just a fact of doing business, I told them, and they need to understand what arrangements they are agreeing to. I made a point of not “telling” the students what to do, but instead guided them to seek an understanding of contracts, licensing and income avenues that’s necessary to stay relevant in the freelance market.

I like the chance to give back a bit especially when it involves helping younger photographers find their way. I was there once and had wonderful mentors and friends guide me into the freelancing world. It’s only right I do the same for others when given the opportunity.

Todd Bigelow Photography

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